What is Hacking? and how Normal user can protect.

Hacking is the gaining of access (wanted or unwanted) to a computer and viewing, copying, or creating data (leaving a trace) without intention of destroying data or maliciously harming the computer.

Hacking is a broad term use to describe many complex activities wherein the end goal is typically to obtain access to a computer system’s servers, database(s) or stored files. this access may be any combination or desired or undesired, and legal or illegal.

Introduction to Ethical Hacking

The digital world is developing rapidly and furiously, and there is a need to secure data at every stage. Since everything — personal information, bank information, friends, family, etc. is shared online now, data has to be secure at every point. Many cybercriminals are looking for opportunities to steal confidential data for many purposes, including conflict of interest, national security breach, terrorist activities, and so on.

Ethical hacking services provide a solution to safeguard business and government networks from such attacks and provide high data security. We can prevent data from being stolen or misused through ethical hacking, identify vulnerabilities or weak points, implement secure networks, and protect the data. There are five main types of ethical hacking, and most of us know most of them:

  1. Web application hacking
  2. Web server hacking
  3. System hacking
  4. Wireless network hacking
  5. Social engineering

Each type of hacking requires certain skills, tools, and techniques, and the ethical hackers need to think just how an actual malicious hacker would for a thorough test. They should identify loopholes, know about penetration testing, use the appropriate tools to carry out the hack, and be prepared. Even if there is an actual attack, the loss is minimal.

Types of Hackers

Hacking is an exciting topic, and so are the hackers. That’s why there are different types of them based on their intentions:

  • White Hat Hacker: Well, these are the good guys or ethical hackers. They exploit the security systems to look for loopholes so that the ‘bad guys’ don’t do that. They have permission from respective companies to do so for the sole purpose of identifying potential security threats. Companies like Google, Facebook, and Microsoft, that store sensitive data hire white-hat hackers.
  • Grey Hat Hacker: Grey-hat hackers are one step ahead of white-hat hackers and exploit the networks left and right to identify vulnerabilities and also correct them to get money from the organization. They do not have malicious intentions and inform the authorities and intelligence agencies about security loopholes that can be dangerous.
  • Black Hat Hacker: This type of hacker tries to gain unauthorized access into a network to compromise security systems, shutting down systems, and altering website functions. These hackers try to get access to personal data, financial data, and passwords.

Some Recommendations for Normal internet user(s):

Where was the last public place you visited that had Wi-Fi? These days, nearly every coffee shop, library, airport and hotel offer a way to access the internet from your cell phone or other mobile device. That means the information you have on your phone could be available to hackers in the area — unless you’ve taken steps to protect your data. Here are a few recommendations from the University of Michigan:

1. Don’t access personal or financial data with public Wi-Fi.

This may seem like a no-brainer, but you’d be surprised how many people check their bank accounts or make purchases with a credit card while using public Wi-Fi. It’s best to do those things on a secure connection.

2. Turn off anything you don’t need.

Hackers can use certain features on your phone to get at your information, location or connection. So, instead of keeping your GPS, wireless connection, and geo-tracking on all the time, just turn them on when you need them.

3. Choose your apps wisely.

Only download apps from trustworthy sources that have established a good reputation. Make sure you update your software and apps regularly and get rid of old apps you don’t use.

Use a password, lock code or encryption.

Make sure your passwords are at least eight characters long, with a mix of upper and lower case, and include numbers or other characters, and never use the auto-complete feature for passwords. You can use the storage encryption feature on your phone to protect your private data and set your screen to timeout after five minutes or less.

Use a password, lock code or encryption.

Make sure your passwords are at least eight characters long, with a mix of upper and lower case, and include numbers or other characters, and never use the auto-complete feature for passwords. You can use the storage encryption feature on your phone to protect your private data and set your screen to timeout after five minutes or less.

Be sceptical about links and attachments.

If you’re not sure about the source, don’t use the link or open the attachment.

4. Trace or erase.

Make sure your data is secure if your mobile device is stolen or lost. You can set up your device to lock itself after a pre-set number of failed log-in attempts.

20 ways to keep your internet identity safe from hackers

THE DOS AND DON’TS OF ONLINE SAFETY

1. Never click on a link you did not expect to receive

The golden rule. The main way criminals infect PCs with malware is by luring users to click on a link or open an attachment. “Sometimes phishing emails contain obvious spelling mistakes and poor grammar and are easy to spot,” says Sidaway of Integralis. “However, targeted attacks and well-executed mass mailings can be almost indistinguishable [from genuine emails].” Social media has helped criminals profile individuals, allowing them to be much more easily targeted, he adds. “They can see what you’re interested in or what you [post] about and send you crafted messages, inviting you to click on something. Don’t.”

2. Use different passwords on different sites

With individuals typically having anything up to 100 online accounts, the tendency has become to share one or two passwords across accounts or use very simple ones, such as loved ones’ names, first pets or favourite sports teams. Indeed, research by Ofcom last month revealed that over half of UK adults (55%) use the same passwords for most, if not all, websites they visit, while one in four (26%) use birthdays or names as passwords. Any word found in the dictionary is easily crackable. Instead, says Sian John, online security consultant at Symantec, have one memorable phrase or a line from a favourite song or poem. For example: “The Observer is a Sunday newspaper” becomes “toiasn”. Add numerals and a special character thus: “T0!asn”. Now for every site you log on to, add the first and last letter of that site to the start and end of the phrase, so the password for Amazon would be “AT0!asnn”. At first glance, unguessable. But for you, still memorable.”

3. Never reuse your main email password

A hacker who has cracked your main email password has the keys to your [virtual] kingdom. Passwords from the other sites you visit can be reset via your main email account. A criminal can trawl through your emails and find a treasure trove of personal data: from banking to passport details, including your date of birth, all of which enables ID fraud. Identity theft is estimated to cost the UK almost £2bn a year.

4. Use anti-virus software

German security institute AV-Test found that in 2010 there were 49m new strains of malware, meaning that anti-virus software manufacturers are engaged in constant game of “whack-a-mole”. Sometimes their reaction times are slow — US security firm Imperva tested 40 anti-virus packages and found that the initial detection rate of a new virus was only 5%. Much like flu viruses and vaccine design, it takes the software designers a while to catch up with the hackers. Last year AV-Test published the results of a 22-month study of 27 different anti-virus suites and top-scoring packages were Bitdefender, Kaspersky and F-Secure. Meanwhile, security expert Brian Krebs published the results of a study of 42 packages which showed on average a 25% detection rate of malware — so they are not the entire answer, just a useful part of it.

5. If in doubt, block
Just say no to social media invitations (such as Facebook-friend or LinkedIn connection requests) from people you don’t know. It’s the cyber equivalent of inviting the twitchy guy who looks at you at the bus stop into your home.

6. Think before you tweet and how you share information

Again, the principal risk is ID fraud. Trawling for personal details is the modern day equivalent of “dumpster-diving”, in which strong-stomached thieves would trawl through bins searching for personal documents, says Symantec’s John. “Many of the same people who have learned to shred documents like bank statements will happily post the same information on social media. Once that information is out there, you don’t necessarily have control of how other people use it.” She suggests a basic rule: “If you aren’t willing to stand at Hyde Park Corner and say it, don’t put it on social media.”

7. If you have a “wipe your phone” feature, you should set it up

Features such as Find My iPhone, Android Lost or BlackBerry Protect allow you to remotely to erase all your personal data, should your device be lost or stolen. “Absolutely, set it up,” advises Derek Halliday of mobile security specialist Lookout. “In the case where your phone is gone for good, having a wipe feature can protect your information from falling into the wrong hands. Even if you didn’t have the foresight to sign up, many wipe your phone features can be implemented after the fact.”

8. Only shop online on secure sites

Before entering your card details, always ensure that the locked padlock or unbroken key symbol is showing in your browser, cautions industry advisory body Financial Fraud Action UK. Additionally the beginning of the online retailer’s internet address will change from “http” to “https” to indicate a connection is secure. Be wary of sites that change back to http once you’ve logged on.

9. Don’t assume banks will pay you back

Banks must refund a customer if he or she has been the victim of fraud, unless they can prove that the customer has acted “fraudulently” or been “grossly negligent”. Yet as with any case of fraud, the matter is always determined on an individual basis. “Anecdotally, a customer who has been a victim of a phishing scam by unwittingly providing a fraudster with their account details and passwords only to be later defrauded could be refunded,” explains Michelle Whiteman, spokesperson for the Payments Council, an industry body. “However, were they to fall victim to the same fraud in the future, after their bank had educated them about how to stay safe, it is possible a subsequent refund won’t be so straightforward. Under payment services regulations, the onus is on the payment-service provider to prove that the customer was negligent, not vice versa. Credit card protection is provided under the Consumer Credit Act and offers similar protection.”

10. Ignore pop-ups

Pop-ups can contain malicious software which can trick a user into verifying something. “[But if and when you do], a download will be performed in the background, which will install malware,” says Sidaway. “This is known as a drive-by download. Always ignore pop-ups offering things like site surveys on e-commerce sites, as they are sometimes where the malcode is.”

11. Be wary of public Wi-Fi

Most Wi-Fi hotspots do not encrypt information and once a piece of data leaves your device headed for a web destination, it is “in the clear” as it transfers through the air on the wireless network, says Symantec’s Sian John. “That means any ‘packet sniffer’ [a program which can intercept data] or malicious individual who is sitting in a public destination with a piece of software that searches for data being transferred on a Wi-Fi network can intercept your unencrypted data. If you choose to bank online on public Wi-Fi, that’s very sensitive data you are transferring. We advise either using encryption [software], or only using public Wi-Fi for data which you’re happy to be public — and that shouldn’t include social network passwords.”

12. Run more than one email account

Thinking about having one for your bank and other financial accounts, another for shopping and one for social networks. If one account is hacked, you won’t find everything compromised. And it helps you spot phishing emails, because if an email appears in your shopping account purporting to come from your bank, for example, you’ll immediately know it’s a fake.

13. Macs are as vulnerable as PCs

Make no mistake, your shiny new MacBook Air can be attacked too. It’s true that Macs used to be less of a target, simply because criminals used to go after the largest number of users — ie Windows — but this is changing. “Apple and Microsoft have both added a number of security features which have significantly increased the effectiveness of security on their software,” says Sidaway, “but determined attackers are still able to find new ways to exploit users on almost any platform.”

14. Don’t store your card details on websites

Err on the side of caution when asked if you want to store your credit card details for future use. Mass data security breaches (where credit card details are stolen en masse) aren’t common, but why take the risk? The extra 90 seconds it takes to key in your details each time is a small price to pay.

15. Add a DNS service to protect other devices

A DNS or domain name system service converts a web address (a series of letters) into a machine-readable IP address (a series of numbers). You’re probably using your ISP’s DNS service by default, but you can opt to subscribe to a service such as OpenDNS or Norton ConnectSafe, which redirect you if you attempt to access a malicious site, says Sian John. “This is helpful for providing some security (and parental control) across all the devices in your home including tablets, TVs and games consoles that do not support security software. But they shouldn’t be relied upon as the only line of defence, as they can easily be bypassed.”

16. Enable two-step verification

If your email or cloud service offers it — Gmail, Dropbox, Apple and Facebook do — take the trouble to set this up. In addition to entering your password, you are also asked to enter a verification code sent via SMS to your phone. In the case of Gmail you only have to enter a fresh code every 30 days or when you log on from a different computer or device. So a hacker might crack your password, but without the unique and temporary verification code should not be able to access your account.

17. Lock your phone and tablet devices

Keep it locked, just as you would your front door. Keying in a password or code 40-plus times a day might seem like a hassle but, says Lookout’s Derek Halliday, “It’s your first line of defence.” Next-generation devices, however, are set to employ fingerprint scanning technology as additional security.

18. Be careful on auction sites

On these sites in particular, says Symantec’s Sian John, exercise vigilance. “Check the seller feedback and if a deal looks too good then it may well be,” she says. “Keep your online payment accounts secure by regularly changing your passwords, checking the bank account to which it is linked and consider having a separate bank account or credit card for use on them, to limit any potential fraud still further.”

19. Lock down your Facebook account

Facebook regularly updates its timeline and privacy settings, so it is wise to monitor your profile, particularly if the design of Facebook has changed. Firstly, in the privacy settings menu, under “who can see my stuff?” change this to “friends” (be warned: setting this to “friends of friends” means that, according to one Pew study, on average you are sharing information with 156,569 people). Also in privacy, setting “limit old posts” applies friends-only sharing to past as well as future posts. Thirdly, disable the ability of other search engines to link to your timeline.

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You should also review the activity log, which shows your entire history of posts and allows you to check who can see them. Similarly, you should look at your photo albums and check you’re happy with the sharing settings for each album. In the future you may want to consider building “lists” — subsets of friends, such as close friends and family, who you might want to share toddler photographs with, rather than every Tom, Dick and Harriet.

Also, remove your home address, phone number, date of birth and any other information that could used to fake your identity. Similarly you might want to delete or edit your “likes” and “groups” — the more hackers know about you, the more convincing a phishing email they can spam you with. Facebook apps often share your data, so delete any you don’t use or don’t remember installing. Finally, use the “view as” tool to check what the public or even a particular individual can see on your profile, continue to “edit” and adjust to taste. If this all sounds rather tedious, you just might prefer to permanently delete your account.

20. Remember you’re human after all

While much of the above are technical solutions to prevent you being hacked and scammed, hacking done well is really the skill of tricking human beings, not computers, by preying on their gullibility, taking advantage of our trust, greed or altruistic impulses. Human error is still the most likely reason why you’ll get hacked.